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Agatha A Nitecka

Agatha A Nitecka

Agatha's work is influenced by her theoretical psychoanalytic background. She is concerned with the intimate and how it’s shared. Her portraiture is unashamedly tinted with tenderness, admiration and longing.

www.agathaa.com

Open print collection in gallery view

Barnabé, Paris

£1050.00

Edition 1 of 9

Medium (paper): matt handprint from b&w 35mm negative film on Ilford Multigrade FB warm tone photographic paper

Size: 16''x20'' (including borders)

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Ross, London

£1050.00

Edition 1 of 9

Medium (paper): matt handprint from b&w 35mm negative film on Ilford Multigrade FB warm tone photographic paper

Size: 16''x20'' (including borders)

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Untitled #1

£825.00

Edition 1 of 9

Medium (paper): matt handprint from b&w 35mm negative film on Ilford Multigrade FB warm tone photographic paper

Size: 16''x20'' (including borders)

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Untitled #2

£825.00

Edition 1 of 9

Matt handprint from b&w 35mm negative film on Ilford Multigrade FB warm tone photographic paper

16''x20'' (including borders)

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Untitled #3

£825.00

Edition 1 of 9

Medium (paper): matt handprint from b&w 35mm negative film on Ilford Multigrade FB warm tone photographic paper

Size: 16''x20'' (including borders)

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Artist Statement

The in-between photography

Coming from a theoretical psychoanalytic background I can’t deny that the writings, which I studied, continuously influence my work. Theoretically, as well as in my photographic work, I’ve been always concerned with the intimate and how it’s shared. Portraiture seems to be the most fulfilling in such a context, perhaps simply because another human being is involved in the process and that’s as close as I can get to love. I believe in an engaged photographer, one that is unashamedly tinting their photographs with tenderness, admiration and longing. I believe in falling in love a little every single time and emotionally investing in the portrait. I believe in being fully present. The awareness of one and the Other is required. A portrait therefore becomes a record of an encounter between the photographer and the photographed. It turns into a shared quiet moment, a space, an emotion. 
 
The concept most helpful to further think of such a shared space is the Winnicottian intermediate area of experience. This intermediate area is inside, outside, and at the border at the same time. It naturally exists in-between, keeps the inner and the outer separate, while at the same time interlinked. Initially it was recognized as a phase in a child’s development and an arena where playing takes place. Afterwards, because of the nature of transitional phenomena, it spreads over to the rest of our experiences and offers a space, for example, for cultural experience. Looking only at the two dimensions: internal reality and external reality, it is the internal reality that is considered subjective, and the external reality that is considered objective, shared by others. However, with a space in-between, the Winnicottian third dimension, what is shared (on the intrapsychic and the intersubjective level) is precisely this area of the intermediate experience, the potential space. 
 
Photography is undeniably a tool which records what’s in front of a camera, but portraiture isn’t as much a record of a person being photographed as it is of an encounter. If an honest emotion has been shared, and paradoxically – if the photographer tinted the photograph with their presence and captured the togetherness of the encounter – then the viewer can participate in the experience shared and hopefully feel a similar flutter of emotion. 
 
Let me leave you with a quote from a book I can never part with – Roland Barthes’ ‘A Lover’s Discourse, Fragments’; it perfectly expresses what I tried to capture especially in my Untitled photographs featured here in the ‘Editions’ exhibition: 
 
‘There is not only need for tenderness, there is also need to be tender for the other: we shut ourselves up in mutual kindness, we mother each other reciprocally; we return to the root of all relations, where need and desire join. The tender gesture says: ask me anything that can put your body to sleep, but also do not forget that I desire you – a little, lightly, without trying to seize anything right away.’